Sudden Heart Death

The term "heart attack" refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not always resulting in a cardiac arrest or the death of the heart attack victim.

Sudden Heart Death

Abrupt heart death (abrupt arrest) is death resulting from a sudden loss of heart function (heart arrest). The most typical reason for patients to die all of a sudden from heart arrest is coronary heart disease (fatty buildups in the arteries that provide blood to the heart muscle).

All known heart illness can lead to cardiac arrest or abrupt heart death. Most of the heart arrests that lead to abrupt death occur when the electrical impulses in the infected heart ended up being fast (ventricular tachycardia), chaotic (ventricular fibrillation) or both. Some heart arrests are due to severe slowing of the heart.

When sudden death takes place in young grownups, other heart abnormalities are more likely causes. Under certain conditions, various heart medications and other drugs– as well as prohibited drug abuse– can lead to abnormal heart rhythms that trigger sudden death.

The term “enormous cardiovascular disease” is frequently mistakenly used in the media to describe unexpected death. The term “cardiovascular disease” refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not always resulting in a heart attack or the death of the heart attack victim. A cardiac arrest may cause cardiac arrest and sudden heart death, however the terms aren’t associated.

Unexpected heart death (sudden arrest) is death resulting from an abrupt loss of heart function (heart arrest). Under certain conditions, various heart medications and other drugs– as well as unlawful drug abuse– can lead to abnormal heart rhythms that trigger unexpected death.

The term “heart attack” refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not always resulting in a cardiac arrest or the death of the heart attack victim.

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