Gluten and Thyroid Gland: Everything You Need To Know

Over 250 million people worldwide suffer from hypothyroidism or lack of thyroid hormone, and one in eight women will meet with thyroid problems at some point in life.

Gluten and Thyroid Gland: Everything You Need To Know

There are only two types of receptors that are found in every cell of your body, the thyroid receptor, and the receptor D vitamin.

If the thyroid gland is not functioning at an optimal level, then the rest of the body will not work at a certain level. Over 250 million people worldwide suffer from hypothyroidism or lack of thyroid hormone, and one in eight women will meet with thyroid problems at some point in life.

Gluten and thyroid gland

Since most of the problem of insufficient thyroid hormone is somewhere in the range of autoimmune diseases, it is necessary to understand what causes the immune system to “attack” the thyroid gland. What is happening, the case of mistaken identity, a gluten one of the main culprits.

When gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains, pass through the lining of the intestine and enter the bloodstream, your immune system will mark a foreign body (gluten) antibodies for destruction. The problem is that your immune system can replace the thyroid gland to gluten due to which it can be an “attack”.

Gluten intolerance

Most people when talking about the intolerance to gluten think of celiac disease, but it is only one of the manifestations of intolerance to gluten. Studies show that only about 10% of people with celiac disease have symptoms of intolerance to gluten.

Approximately every twentieth person in the world has the non-celiac intolerance to gluten. Although most people with autoimmune diseases, avoiding gluten few weeks and then give up (because they are not sure whether this protein is the cause of their problems), research shows that it takes up to six months to help the body recover from the inflammatory response.

10 signs that you are uncomfortable with gluten

  • Digestive disorders, such as gas, bloating, diarrhea and even constipation (most pronounced in children after consuming gluten).
  • Keratosis pilaris (also known as “chicken skin”) on your hands
  • Fatigue or tiredness after entering a meal containing gluten
  • The diagnosis of an autoimmune disease, such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis or scleroderma
  • Neurological symptoms, such as dizziness or feeling that you do not have a balance
  • Hormonal imbalance
  • Migraine headaches
  • The diagnosis of chronic fatigue
  • Inflammation, swelling or pain in the joints (fingers, knees, hips)
  • Problems with the mood, such as anxiety, depression

What to do if you suspect that gluten causes problems?

You can do the same as they have already done many others, to test yourself. In people with autoimmune diseases that are sensitive to gluten, throwing gluten from the diet stops the autoimmune destruction of tissue, reduces antibody and symptoms disappear.

Elimination-provocation diet is the best test that you can do. The good old method “own skin”. It takes it out of eating what you suspect that bothers you (in this case gluten, but you can do it with other foods) for a while, at least one month but better and longer.

If during this period comes to improving your health, or to withdrawal symptoms that are bothering you, you’ve done half the job – elimination part.

The rest of the work – part of provocation. Again, start eating that food that you kicked and follow the reaction of your body. If deteriorate, or if you return the old symptoms, then you know you’re really sensitive to gluten and you have to permanently out of your diet.

More in G+ Healthy Tips, healthy tips, MP Health Tips, MP Healthy Food
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